Lucas’ Birth Story {Part Two}

Lucas was just born and I’ve only caught a glimpse of him.

I’m laying in a hospital bed, in the surgery recovery room, can’t feel the bottom half of my body and I don’t know where Lucas and Walt are.

I’m not sure how much time goes by, two hours, maybe more, but I finally see Walt. I know we talked for a bit, but all I remember is he asking if I’m ok, that he loved me and that he felt that he needed to be with Lucas. He’d see me soon.

More time goes by. I’m still laying in the hospital bed, a nurse checks on me every once in a while and my toes start to tingle. I guess my bottom half is starting to wake up.

I hear the sounds of newborns, excited moms and dads and I just lay there alone wondering what’s going on.

More time goes by and finally someone comes to take me to my room. On the way to my room, I’m overcome with excitement, joy and anticipation of holding Lucas for the first time. Oh wait… that’s not what I was thinking. I was too busy trying not hurl all over the hospital.

Let’s backtrack a little. I was hypertensive during my pregnancy and evidently it is common for a full term baby, as Lucas was, to be undernourished because of it. Further testing proved that he had a glucose level of 6 and should have been at least 50. In layman’s terms, I starved the poor guy.

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Lucas was immediately sent to the NICU after his glucose test results came back. Once in the NICU Lucas was given glucose intravenously.

Finally, just before midnight, Thursday, June 7, I was able to see him. Although, Walt had explained to me what had been going on, it still didn’t prepare me. I’m not sure that I can quite express into words the emotions I went through upon entering the NICU.

I was in a wheelchair so Walt pushed me through the doors and all I see are these tiny precious babies fighting for their lives. Hooked up to wires and sleeping in little plastic boxes. The emotions overwhelm me and the tears start to flow.

And then there he was.

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Sound asleep. IV in his belly. Oxygen cannula in his nose. His feet wrapped in bandages because his toes had been pricked so many times for various blood tests. Monitors buzzing, beeping and whirring.

My little guy was finally here. 10 little fingers and 10 little toes. He was the cutest little four pounder I had ever seen.

Although Lucas was off of the glucose IV within 48 hours, it would be another 14 days filled with laughs, frustrations, hopes and way too many tears to count before we brought him home. Our additional stay in the NICU was due to Lucas “desating” (desaturation.) In other words, when he was in a deep sleep he’d oh so slightly stop breathing. So, until Lucas could make it a full 48 hours without his oxygen levels going below a certain level, our stay in hotel NICU would continue.

Lucas’ doctors speculated that his lungs may have been a bit on the premie side due to his malnutrition in the womb. We’ll never know for sure, but it certainly made sense considering his doctors could not find anything else that could cause the desaturation.

And then Lucas finally passed the 48 hour mark! I guess he decided he was finally ready to go home.

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I can’t say enough about the care Lucas received from his doctors and nurses – an amazing group of people surrounded Lucas 24/7 for those 16 days. Walt and I will be forever grateful to them and to our family that stood by us.

So now you know how you came into this world. It was a bit of a bumpy ride, but worth it. And to this day you continue to prove what a strong, resilient, stubborn, fearless, loving, precious, silly son we have on our hands.

 

Lucas’ Birth Story {Part One}

 

 


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